landsat

"Creada para que visualices nuestro planeta y comprendas cómo ha cambiado la Tierra a lo largo del tiempo, la aplicación Esri Landsat Explorer proporciona la potencia de los satélites Landsat, que recopilan datos más allá de lo que el ojo puede ver. Utilice esta aplicación para dibujar en las diferentes bandas de Landsat para explorar mejor la geología, la vegetación, la agricultura y las ciudades del planeta. Además, acceda a todo el archivo de Landsat para visualizar cómo ha cambiado la superficie de la Tierra en los últimos cuarenta años." 🖱Aquí te dejamos el link 👉 http://landsatexplorer.esri.com/ 🔎 Para más info recordá visitar nuestro sitio web o facebook 🛰 #landsat #landsatexplorer #Teledeteccion #Labgeot #esri

Flower Power in the Netherlands Every year, seven million flower bulbs are planted in Garden in the . When the final winter chill disappears and springtime arrives, the bulbs sprout to produce beautiful rows of reds, oranges, and yellows—including 800 varieties of . The season begins in March with purple crocuses, followed by hyacinths and daffodils. It ends with tulips reaching peak bloom in April. The vivid display draws more than a million tourists, who line up for a glance before the flowers are harvested and disappear. The colorful floral spectrum can also be seen from space. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on 8 captured this scene on April 21, 2018. The landscape in these images—known as the “bulb region”—lies about 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Amsterdam. It contains numerous gardens, including Keukenhof, one of the world’s largest flower gardens. The Netherlands is the largest producer of tulip bulbs in the world, providing 4.2 billion annually and exporting half. https://go.nasa.gov/2rN4QFq @nasa #Keukenhof #Netherlands. #tulips. #Landsat #tulip #bulbregion #flowers #nasaearth Via: [email protected]_eo #nasa_eo #Nasa

Sweltering, Smoky Fires in Siberia A large number of intense have spread across far eastern this spring, shrouding the skies, roads, and forests in smoke. In just six days between May 7–13, 2018, Russian firefighters beat back 693 fires in 40 territories. Many of the fires were located in the Amur Oblast region in . Crews are still working to extinguish fires in the area. This image of the blazes in Amur Oblast was captured by 8 on May 7, 2018. Natural-color data (bands 4–3–2) are overlaid with infrared data (bands 6 and 5) to reveal still-burning hot spots. A dry, warm winter has set the stage for a difficult wildfire season in 2018 in Russia. Forest fires are common in this heavily forested region, and the season usually starts in April or May. Farmers in this area also burn old crops to help clear fields and replenish the soil with nutrients; such fires occasionally burn out of control. Amur Oblast has so far experienced more fires per month this year than any since 2008, according to the Global Fire Emissions Database. Scientists have observed a spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and aerosols since the recent Siberian fires started raging. Aerosols, tiny airborne particles in the smoke, have been carried by weather fronts across the Pacific Ocean and into Canada, according to NASA’s Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite. The large quantities and long-distance transport of these aerosols could indicate a pyrocumulus event. Towering clouds are formed by heat from fire, rather than evaporation from sun-warmed ground. They tend to loft high into the atmosphere, where it can be swept away by upper–level winds. Also, high levels of carbon monoxide are forecasted to reach the Arctic, according to Mark Parrington, a senior scientist at the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service of the European Centre for Medium–Range Weather Forecasts. https://go.nasa.gov/2rT5HEE @nasa #fires #Russia #Siberia. #Landsat #pyrocumulus #smoke #nasaearth #amuroblast #forestfire #forestfires #wildfire Via: [email protected]_eo #nasa_eo #Nasa

جزوه آموزشی تصحیحات رادیومتریک و اتمسفری لندست در نرم افزار انوی http://girps.net/product/radiometric/ #انوی #سنجش_از_دور #لندست #آموزش #landsat #remote_sensing #envi #girps #booklet #radiometric #atmospheric

The Operational Land Imager 2 (OLI-2) for #Landsat 9 is coming together at Ball Aerospace! Check out these new photos from Focal Plane Assembly integration. 🛰📸🌎 OLI-2’s 14-module detector array (pictured) enables it to scan with a push-broom method, allowing the entire globe to be imaged every 16 days. Landsat

Regrann from @usgs - Image of the Week - Hawaii Lava Flow — Lava continues to flow, changing the landscape, vegetation and coastline in Hawaii. ▫️ New fissures opened up on Hawaii’s Big Island in early May, spouting lava that destroyed homes. Landsat has been recording the lava flows since the eruption began in 1983. The most current image shown is from India’s Resourcesat-2 satellite. In these images, green vegetated land is repeatedly covered with dark lava flows, and infrared imaging shows orange spots of heat. Eruptions from this volcano have a history of burying towns. The 1991 image shows a new lava flow that buried an entire community in 15–25 meters of lava. The image series also shows how the coastline of the island has changed as various lava flows reached the ocean. Landsat and other satellites continue to monitor the changing landscape of the island. ▫️ ➡️Learn more about EROS work at eros.usgs.gov ▫️ #usgs #science #lava #eruption #volcanoes #volcano #hawaii #hvo #kilauea #satelliteimagery #landsat #eros #video #naturalhazards #hawaiivolcano #kilaueaeruption #hawaiieruption #lavagroundzero #leilani #regrann

These are pieces from eARTh project. A joint venture between geographer De. Mryka Hall Breyer from university of Calgary and myself as artist. They are my interpretation of satellite images. To see more visit www.sharonthirkettle.com #science #ceramic #satellite #earth #remotesensing #landsat #satellite #clayart #canadianartist

Saudi Arabia agriculture in desert #LANDSAT_8 #NDVI #satellite_imagery #landsat

🤓🗾🤓Palpitando el nuevo curso de imágenes satelitales!!! 🤓🗾🤓 #SIG #GIS #Geografia #Geography #Mapas #Maps #ImagenesSatelitales #landsat #teledetección #QGIS

#FastRepost from @nasa_eo by @fastrepost_app ••• Sweltering, Smoky Fires in Siberia A large number of intense #fires have spread across far eastern #Russia this spring, shrouding the skies, roads, and forests in smoke. In just six days between May 7–13, 2018, Russian firefighters beat back 693 fires in 40 territories. Many of the fires were located in the Amur Oblast region in #Siberia. Crews are still working to extinguish fires in the area. This image of the blazes in Amur Oblast was captured by #Landsat 8 on May 7, 2018. Natural-color data (bands 4–3–2) are overlaid with infrared data (bands 6 and 5) to reveal still-burning hot spots. A dry, warm winter has set the stage for a difficult wildfire season in 2018 in Russia. Forest fires are common in this heavily forested region, and the season usually starts in April or May. Farmers in this area also burn old crops to help clear fields and replenish the soil with nutrients; such fires occasionally burn out of control. Amur Oblast has so far experienced more fires per month this year than any since 2008, according to the Global Fire Emissions Database. Scientists have observed a spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and aerosols since the recent Siberian fires started raging. Aerosols, tiny airborne particles in the smoke, have been carried by weather fronts across the Pacific Ocean and into Canada, according to NASA’s Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite. The large quantities and long-distance transport of these aerosols could indicate a pyrocumulus event. Towering #pyrocumulus clouds are formed by heat from fire, rather than evaporation from sun-warmed ground. They tend to loft #smoke high into the atmosphere, where it can be swept away by upper–level winds. Also, high levels of carbon monoxide are forecasted to reach the Arctic, according to Mark Parrington, a senior scientist at the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service of the European Centre for Medium–Range Weather Forecasts. https://go.nasa.gov/2rT5HEE @nasa #nasaearth #amuroblast #forestfire #forestfires #wildfire

regram @nasa_eo Sweltering, Smoky Fires in Siberia A large number of intense #fires have spread across far eastern #Russia this spring, shrouding the skies, roads, and forests in smoke. In just six days between May 7–13, 2018, Russian firefighters beat back 693 fires in 40 territories. Many of the fires were located in the Amur Oblast region in #Siberia. Crews are still working to extinguish fires in the area. This image of the blazes in Amur Oblast was captured by #Landsat 8 on May 7, 2018. Natural-color data (bands 4–3–2) are overlaid with infrared data (bands 6 and 5) to reveal still-burning hot spots. A dry, warm winter has set the stage for a difficult wildfire season in 2018 in Russia. Forest fires are common in this heavily forested region, and the season usually starts in April or May. Farmers in this area also burn old crops to help clear fields and replenish the soil with nutrients; such fires occasionally burn out of control. Amur Oblast has so far experienced more fires per month this year than any since 2008, according to the Global Fire Emissions Database. Scientists have observed a spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and aerosols since the recent Siberian fires started raging. Aerosols, tiny airborne particles in the smoke, have been carried by weather fronts across the Pacific Ocean and into Canada, according to NASA’s Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite. The large quantities and long-distance transport of these aerosols could indicate a pyrocumulus event. Towering #pyrocumulus clouds are formed by heat from fire, rather than evaporation from sun-warmed ground. They tend to loft #smoke high into the atmosphere, where it can be swept away by upper–level winds. Also, high levels of carbon monoxide are forecasted to reach the Arctic, according to Mark Parrington, a senior scientist at the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service of the European Centre for Medium–Range Weather Forecasts. https://go.nasa.gov/2rT5HEE @nasa #nasaearth #amuroblast #forestfire #forestfires #wildfire

Sweltering, Smoky Fires in Siberia A large number of intense #fires have spread across far eastern #Russia this spring, shrouding the skies, roads, and forests in smoke. In just six days between May 7–13, 2018, Russian firefighters beat back 693 fires in 40 territories. Many of the fires were located in the Amur Oblast region in #Siberia. Crews are still working to extinguish fires in the area. This image of the blazes in Amur Oblast was captured by #Landsat 8 on May 7, 2018. Natural-color data (bands 4–3–2) are overlaid with infrared data (bands 6 and 5) to reveal still-burning hot spots. A dry, warm winter has set the stage for a difficult wildfire season in 2018 in Russia. Forest fires are common in this heavily forested region, and the season usually starts in April or May. Farmers in this area also burn old crops to help clear fields and replenish the soil with nutrients; such fires occasionally burn out of control. Amur Oblast has so far experienced more fires per month this year than any since 2008, according to the Global Fire Emissions Database. Scientists have observed a spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and aerosols since the recent Siberian fires started raging. Aerosols, tiny airborne particles in the smoke, have been carried by weather fronts across the Pacific Ocean and into Canada, according to NASA’s Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite. The large quantities and long-distance transport of these aerosols could indicate a pyrocumulus event. Towering #pyrocumulus clouds are formed by heat from fire, rather than evaporation from sun-warmed ground. They tend to loft #smoke high into the atmosphere, where it can be swept away by upper–level winds. Also, high levels of carbon monoxide are forecasted to reach the Arctic, according to Mark Parrington, a senior scientist at the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service of the European Centre for Medium–Range Weather Forecasts. https://go.nasa.gov/2rT5HEE @nasa #nasaearth #amuroblast #forestfire #forestfires #wildfire

Spring Color in the North Sea The increasing sunlight and warmth of springtime provoke buds and blooms amidst the trees, flowers, and grasses on land. Warm air and sunlight also beget warmer ocean waters and provoke blooms of the “grass of the sea”— #phytoplankton. These tiny, plant-like organisms float near the ocean surface and turn sunlight and carbon dioxide into sugars and oxygen. In turn, they become food for the grazing zooplankton, shellfish, and finfish of the sea. On May 5, 2018, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on #Landsat 8 acquired this natural-color image of a phytoplankton bloom in the North Sea. The milkier, lighter-colored waters are probably filled with #coccolithophores, while greener areas may be diatoms. (It is impossible to know for sure without direct water samples.) The brightness of the color may reflect the density of the phytoplankton, while the various swirls and shapes trace the intricate movements of currents, eddies, and tides. Phytoplankton are most abundant in the North Sea in late spring and early summer due to high levels of nutrients in the water. Melting sea ice and increased runoff from European rivers—a product of melting snow and spring rains—carry a heavy load of nutrients out to sea, while also freshening the surface waters. Intense seasonal winds blowing over the relatively shallow sea also cause a lot of mixing that brings nutrients to the surface. In a study published in August 2017, a research team from the United Kingdom found that primary production in the North Sea has declined since the late 1980s. The causes for less phytoplankton abundance are not entirely clear, but they appear to be related to decreased nutrients—thanks to less runoff from European farms and cities—increasing sea temperatures, and changing light levels. Whatever the cause, the decrease in primary production has coincided with a decrease in zooplankton and some higher forms of marine life that consume phytoplankton. At the same time, many fish stocks remained stable, probably due to better fisheries management amid the changing ocean conditions. https://go.nasa.gov/2rrWNh9 #northsea

Flower Power in the Netherlands Every year, seven million flower bulbs are planted in Garden in the . When the final winter chill disappears and springtime arrives, the bulbs sprout to produce beautiful rows of reds, oranges, and yellows—including 800 varieties of . The season begins in March with purple crocuses, followed by hyacinths and daffodils. It ends with tulips reaching peak bloom in April. The vivid display draws more than a million tourists, who line up for a glance before the flowers are harvested and disappear. The colorful floral spectrum can also be seen from space. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on 8 captured this scene on April 21, 2018. The landscape in these images—known as the “bulb region”—lies about 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Amsterdam. It contains numerous gardens, including Keukenhof, one of the world’s largest flower gardens. The Netherlands is the largest producer of tulip bulbs in the world, providing 4.2 billion annually and exporting half. https://go.nasa.gov/2rN4QFq @nasa #Keukenhof #Netherlands. #tulips. #Landsat #tulip #bulbregion #flowers #nasaearth Via: [email protected]_eo #nasa_eo #Nasa

جلسه اول آموزش جامع ENVI پردازش تصاویر ماهواره ای تصحیحات رادیومتریک http://girps.net/product/envi01/ #سنجش_از_دور #سنجنده #لندست #آموزش #انوی #envi #landsat #radiometric #girps #آسام #آکادمی_سامانه_اطلاعات_مکانی

#Repost @nasa with @get_repost ・・・ This natural-color image of the erupting Kilauea volcano in Hawaii shows the aftermath of lava fountains and explosions that rose more than 100 feet into the air on May 14. Our satellites acquire data to measure the height of volcanic plumes and make observations about the properties of the particles found within the plumes. In this image, the areas appearing red show where our satellite detected unusually warm temperatures associated with lava, while recent lava flows appear gray, forested areas are dark green and homes are small white dots. We will continue to use satellite data to understand Kilauea’s geology and behavior. Credit: NASA/Joshua Stevens/@USGS #nasa #science #volcano #kilauea #hawaii #earth #landsat #picoftheday #greenisland #earthview #views #satellite #lava #explosion #erupt #data

#Repost @nasa: This natural-color image of the erupting #Kilauea volcano in #Hawaii shows the aftermath of #lava fountains and explosions that rose more than 100 feet into the air on May 14. Our satellites acquire data to measure the height of volcanic plumes and make observations about the properties of the particles found within the plumes. In this #image, the areas appearing red show where our #satellite detected unusually warm temperatures associated with lava, while recent lava flows appear gray, forested areas are dark green and homes are small white dots. We will continue to use satellite data to understand Kilauea’s #geology and behavior. Credit: NASA/Joshua Stevens/@USGS #nasa #science #volcano #earth #landsat #picoftheday #earthview #views #explosion #erupt #photography #bigisland #caldera #nofilter #mothernature

This natural-color image of the erupting Kilauea volcano in Hawaii shows the aftermath of lava fountains and explosions that rose more than 100 feet into the air on May 14. Our satellites acquire data to measure the height of volcanic plumes and make observations about the properties of the particles found within the plumes. In this image, the areas appearing red show where our satellite detected unusually warm temperatures associated with lava, while recent lava flows appear gray, forested areas are dark green and homes are small white dots. We will continue to use satellite data to understand Kilauea’s geology and behavior. Credit: NASA/Joshua Stevens/ #nasa #science #volcano #kilauea #hawaii #earth #landsat #picoftheday #greenisland #earthview #views #satellite #lava #explosion #erupt #data

regram @nasa__eo__ Flower Power in the Netherlands Every year, seven million flower bulbs are planted in Garden in the . When the final winter chill disappears and springtime arrives, the bulbs sprout to produce beautiful rows of reds, oranges, and yellows—including 800 varieties of . The season begins in March with purple crocuses, followed by hyacinths and daffodils. It ends with tulips reaching peak bloom in April. The vivid display draws more than a million tourists, who line up for a glance before the flowers are harvested and disappear. The colorful floral spectrum can also be seen from space. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on 8 captured this scene on April 21, 2018. The landscape in these images—known as the “bulb region”—lies about 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Amsterdam. It contains numerous gardens, including Keukenhof, one of the world’s largest flower gardens. The Netherlands is the largest producer of tulip bulbs in the world, providing 4.2 billion annually and exporting half. https://go.nasa.gov/2rN4QFq @nasa #Keukenhof #Netherlands. #tulips. #Landsat #tulip #bulbregion #flowers #nasaearth Via: [email protected]_eo #nasa_eo #Nasa